Glass, torpedo bottle; unknown maker; 1840-1870; RX.1975.18

Name/Title

Glass, torpedo bottle

About this object

This glass bottle was found on the property of L Henderson, Coal Creek and donated to the museum in 1975 by Miss I Henderson of Roslyn, Dunedin.

(Following information from the Te Papa Museum site NZ)

Torpedo bottles, also known as Hamilton bottles, were used for aerated or carbonated water. They were oval shaped with a neck at one end, and were deliberately designed so that they could not be stored upright. The goal was to keep the cork wet so that it did not dry out and crack, thereby releasing the carbonation. Torpedo bottles were in common use from the 1840s to the 1870s, when they were superseded by the Codd bottle.

Carbonated water was first produced in New Zealand in 1845, and by the end of the century there were aerated water factories in towns and cities across the country. As an article printed in the Star in March 1881 explained, aerated water was produced by 'impregnating' pure water with carbonic acid gas under heavy pressure.

Maker

unknown maker

Maker Role

Manufacturer

Date Made

1840-1870

Period

1850s

Place Made

unknown

Medium and Materials

processed material, glass

Inscription and Marks

none

Measurements

h 230mm x diam 70mm
wt 567g

Object Type

containers

Object number

RX.1975.18

Copyright Licence  

All rights reserved

This object is from
Tags
Bottle
Water

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