Photograph, Loading Wool from Stout Estate; Unknown Photographer; 1930-1940; WW....

Name/Title

Photograph, Loading Wool from Stout Estate

About this object

This is a photograph of Manager Harold Yorke and Jack Broadbent tying bales of wool onto a boat at Stout's Estate.

Robert Stout owned land across the water from Waikawa and he called it 'Stout's Park'. Stout purchased the land when Waikawa was first surveyed as they surveyor recognising the estuary a natural port had high ambitions for the area. The Port of Waikawa was to be the centre of Otago and Southland, however, later it was determined that the location was too far south to be a centre. Many rich Dunedin businessmen purchased property in Waikawa at this time, hoping to cash in big when the centre got under way, however, this never happened.

Though Stout never lived on his farm, he often visited.


About Robert Stout and his Estate:

Brought up in Scotland by a family heavily interested in education and politics, Robert Stout immigrated to Dunedin in 1864. Stout became involved in the education system in Dunedin and shifted into political life where he eventually became the 13th Primer of New Zealand, first in 1884 and then again in 1887.

Fearful of New Zealand falling into the same old world social system of wealth landlords and poor tenant farmers, Stout advocated for the government lease of estates to allow for a nation of small holdings.

Place Made

Oceania, New Zealand, South Island, Southland, Waikawa

Maker

Unknown Photographer

Maker Role

Photographer

Date Made

1930-1940

Period

1930s

Medium and Materials

organic, vegetal, processed material, paper

Inscription and Marks

On back in pen: 'Broadbent + Yorke Jackie & Harold tying bales of wool on. E1920/29. WW.85.648B'

Measurements

h 95 mm x w 67 mm

Subject and Association Keywords

Agriculture

Object Type

photographs

Object number

WW.1983.648b

Copyright Licence  

All rights reserved

This object is from
Tags
1930s
Agriculture

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