Wedding dress; 1911; 1988/207/1

Name/Title

Wedding dress

About this object

This wedding dress dates from 1911, a year after King Edward VII’s death and the official end of the ‘Edwardian’ period. In fact, many Edwardian characteristics persisted in fashion until the war years. This bodice, for example, is the typical Edwardian fantasy of lace, embroidery, and beads over cream silk. Faux pearls add a touch of glamour but only on one side; asymmetrical design being a feature of this time. Such trimmings, of exquisite craftsmanship, add variety to what is otherwise a style of dress that had been around for some years. The floating panels at either side of the skirt add a new touch, however, and so does the plunging ‘V’ neck, though it is cloaked here with a lace insert for modesty’s sake.

Doris Robinson wore this dress when she married Cecil Robertson at Palmerston North in early 1911. Neither Doris nor Cecil had any Otago connection; the dress was donated by their daughter-in-law in 1988. She was descended from early Otago settlers and thought the Museum would be a fitting place to care for such a dress. Doris and Cecil’s wedding photo suggests a lavish wedding, with two attendants each as well as five flower girls and a pageboy. They lived to celebrate their diamond-wedding anniversary in 1970. Cecil died soon after but Doris survived until 1989.

Date Made

1911

Object number

1988/207/1

Copyright Licence  

All rights reserved

Awesome 27 Jun 2016 17:21 PM,UTC

Awesome wedding dress.The color of the dress is wonderful. I really love it. Thanks!!

Awesome 27 Jun 2016 17:21 PM,UTC

Awesome wedding dress.The color of the dress is wonderful. I really love it. Thanks!!
http://www.fashionhauler.com/

Awesome 27 Jun 2016 17:20 PM,UTC

Awesome wedding dress.The color of the dress is wonderful. I really love it. Thanks!!
http://www.fashionhauler.com/

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