Lake Series 10, Rotoiti; Brian STRONG; 1974; 430

Name/Title

Lake Series 10, Rotoiti

About this object

An abstracted landscape painting of Lake Rotoiti as seen from a high vantage point, likely to be on the St Arnaud Range. Kerr Bay and the Peninsula are shown in the lower right corner with Black Hill above. The Traverse River flows from the upper centre of the painting out of West Bay to the left. Mount Robert is depicted by the striated silver forms in the upper left side.

Maker

Brian STRONG

Date Made

1974

Medium and Materials

Oil on canvas

Place Made

Nelson

Subject and Association Keywords

Landscapes/Regional landscapes/Nelson landscapes

Subject and Association Keywords

Mountains/Mountain ranges

Subject and Association Keywords

Lake scenes

Subject and Association Keywords

New Zealand/South Island/Nelson/Nelson Lakes

Subject and Association Description

Part of a series based on the Nelson Lakes area. The painting describes Lake Rotoiti from a high view point, probably from a point on the St Arnaud Range. Kerr Bay and the Peninsula are shown in the lower right corner with Black Hill above. The Traverse River flows from the upper centre of the painting out of West Bay to the left. Mount Roberts is depicted by the striated silver forms in the upper left side.

Credit Line

Purchased with the assistance of the Queen Elizabeth II Arts Council in 1976

Object Type

Painting

Object number

430

Copyright Licence  

All rights reserved

Juliet Oliver 05 Dec 2016 00:34 AM,UTC

1. It's the Travers River that flows into the lake at its southern end - which this image doesn't show.

2. The river in the painting will be the Buller, which flows out of the lake near the base of Mt Robert, on the side of the peninsula that's depicted in the painting. You have to cross the Buller just below the source in order to go up Mt Robert - when I started skiing there in 1959 we used a flying fox and working parties built a Bailey bridge a year or two later.

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