Sunnyside Nelson; John GULLY; 805

Name/Title

Sunnyside Nelson

About this object

Sunnyside (later Warwick House) sits nestled against the hill with smoke rising from one of its chimney stacks. The Brook Stream winds down the valley and there is a small cottage on its banks. A fence line runs across the foreground while the hills of the Brook Valley rise in the background.

Maker

John GULLY

Medium and Materials

Watercolour on paper

Subject and Association Keywords

Landscapes/Regional landscapes/Nelson landscapes

Subject and Association Keywords

Architecture

Subject and Association Keywords

Landscapes/River

Subject and Association Keywords

Flora/Tree

Subject and Association Keywords

New Zealand/South Island/Nelson

Subject and Association Description

Sunnyside (later Warwick House) was built in 1854 by Alfred Fell. At that time the only Street near the house was Scotland Street which can be seen to the right of Sunnyside.

Fell sold the house to Nathaniel Edwards in 1860 who then expanded it by adding a wing on the back with two turrets and then the ballroom and four storey turret on the front. These additions were all completed by about 1870, although the back wing no longer exists today.

The painting predates these additions and so was likely painted in the early 1860s soon after Gully's arrival in Nelson.

The building by the Brook Stream is on the same property block and is possibly the gardener's cottage. This area by the Brook is today's Scotland Street and was sold in sections in the 1920s, opening up a more direct route between the city and the Brook Valley.

John Sidney Gully (1984) wrote that the painting was gifted by the artist to Mr Chalmers in payment for making the family pew at the Nelson Cathedral. JSG's sources for this are not revealed and there is no known connection between Sunnyside and a Mr Chalmers. As such his identity is unknown.

Credit Line

Gifted by Miss Jane Dee in 1989

Object Type

Painting

Object number

805

Copyright Licence  

All rights reserved

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